WHY DO WATER BOTTLE HAS AN EXPIRATION DATE??

We all buy food products from the market like bread, butter, jam etc. While purchasing, we keep in check the expiration date. We make sure that we are not buying a rotten product.

We all know why the expiration date is on the food products…..but do you know there is an expiration date on the water bottles too?

So, today I am going to tell you why there is an expiration date on the water bottle.

LET’S GET INTO THIS…..

There is not just one but several reasons why expiration date is put on the water bottles.

1.) PRODUCER’S PROTECTION

bottle 2

If consumers contact drink companies to complain that water they bought several years earlier tastes bad, the bottlers can point out that it’s their own fault for not drinking it by the expiration date.

It’s a good tactic by companies to avoid consumers to claim heavy damages.

It’s like cheating the consumers…..and not taking the full responsibility of their own products.

So, the expiration date on bottled water benefits the manufacturer.

2.) GOVERNMENT BUREAUCRACY

bottle 3

Water is a consumable food product, and as such, it is subject to laws requiring expiration dates on all consumables.

Consumables like bread, jam, butter etc. have expiration dates…

So, water which is also a consumable should have an expiration date.

3.) PLASTIC EFFECT

bottle 4

Water does not go bad, the plastic bottle in which water is contained in does expire, and will eventually start leaching chemicals into the water.

This won’t necessarily render the water toxic, but it might make it taste somewhat sour and it can be bad for health.

Toxic water consumption can lead to severe diseases like cholera, typhoid and much more.

Companies forecast the time when the plastic will start leaching chemicals and put it as the expiration date.

Expiration dates are usually only one element of a printed code that also identifies the date, bottling plant, and other information.

Even though the expiration date itself is meaningless in terms of water going bad, the manufacturing information could be useful in tracking down contamination and bottling errors.

If you find this article helpful and interesting, share it with your friends as much as you can.

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